History

From the very beginning, PEG has focused on providing the latest glass technologies, constant innovation, and superior service. Known to many as “The Glass Expert and Historian”, John Rossi used his knowledge of glass and dedication to the glass industry to establish technology, innovation, and service as the founding principles under which the new company would operate. Born October 24, 1924 in Vineland, NJ, John followed a career path that qualified him particularly well for his role as an entrepreneur in a field that he knew and loved.

After graduating from Elon University, John worked as a chemist at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. After World War II, he worked at chemical and glass companies while pursuing an additional degree in mechanical engineering. Ultimately, he became chief engineer/plant manager at a local glass company where he dreamed of starting his own business. In 1962, PEG was founded and the company began to grow quickly.

Today, PEG remains a privately held, family corporation, that has grown from an idea to a multimillion dollar corporation. Employing a full complement of artisans, engineers, technicians, and support personnel, PEG makes glass parts that go into critical components in a wide range of markets. PEG glass parts can be found in the electricity, protection, industrial, automotive, fiber-optics, medical, scientific, and diagnostic testing markets in 23 countries around the world.

As we have for over half a century, PEG will continue to meet the future glass fabrication challenges presented by new and evolving technologies. We will build upon the foundation of current customers and partner with them as they grow. Using automation where it makes sense, we’ll make products developed by customers better by translating their ideas into glass technology. Engineering expertise will allow us to expand our products and services into new product lines. As a PEG customer, you can continue to expect the extraordinary level of service and depth of relationship that has become the PEG Difference.

Read “A Brief History of Glassmaking” :

By John Rossi